Archive for the ‘Media Production’ Category

Promotion and Exhibition – The Submission

Posted: March 27, 2017 by Alan Hardcastle in FdA 15_17
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Rather than look in detail at Outcome 3 – which is pretty much “do it – following the plan…”, it is useful to look at what you need to submit by the deadline. There are 2 things – a large research folder, and evidence of what you have done. (more…)

Promotion and Exhibition: Professional Practice

Posted: March 6, 2017 by Alan Hardcastle in FdA 15_17
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LO1 – Critically analyse historical and current trends and apply relevant professional marketing and self- promotion methods.

So, step 1 – in English…

  1. Identify Current Trends in Marketing and Promotion, relating them to their historical roots.
  2. critically analyse them.
  3. Identify the methods you are going to use, explaining why
  4. plan how you will use them.

So, the purpose of this outcome is to look what happens in the real world, come up with some ideas for you own promotion & Exhibition, and then put it into action. LO2 & Lo3 follow on from this and are more concerned with skills building and application. (more…)

Managing contributors for FdA Fusion

Posted: February 3, 2017 by Alan Hardcastle in FdA 15_17
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We have the Web site set up, we have old content on there, and we have identified a range of stories to be putting up – including current and future projects (Creative Film Challenge, Major Projects, live brief) and how to guides (Networking, animation, working with clients, technical guides). (more…)

Narratvie Exercise – Monomyth

Posted: January 24, 2017 by Alan Hardcastle in FDA 16_18
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This week, I have a number of things I need you to look at – Composition & Movement and Monomyth.

The first one discusses movement from left to right across the composition of the frame, and the psychology of our understanding of this.

The second talks about the overall structure of the story, based on The Writers Journey and how this is influenced by myths and legends.

So, what I need you to do, is explore elements of both using the camera. Home many of the stages of the monomyth can you represent using composition and movement?

So, for example –
Your character is has the call to adventure, and refuses it – how do you frame the hero? How does the Hero move within the frame?
Crossing the Threshold – How do you show the Character “leaving the limits of their world?” And how would you show them coming back for the Return Threshold?

You can either pick stages and explore them in  a series of shots, or try to construct a narrative from a selection of the stages to show a narrative developement following the Monomyth theory. either way, I am not worried about location, acting or sound / dialogue – I purely want to see how you use the camera to communicate the stage.

 

Monomyth

Posted: January 20, 2017 by Alan Hardcastle in FDA 16_18

On of my favorite approaches to storytelling is the Monomyth. The idea that all stories are essentially linked through the structure to our understanding of myth and legend.
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We are looking at narrative as the series of clues & cues within the frame that tell the story. Focusing on Composition and Movement gives us a chance to simplify the construction of the frame to better communicate the narrative element we are referring too.

Movement within a frame is important, but what does it communicate?

We can look at the main axis of movement in relation to the camera  – up & Down, closer & further away and left & Right. It is this movement across the screen that is potentially the most interesting and least obvious when it comes to meaning.
In the video essay from Channel Criswell, he explores how left to right indicates movement towards the future or progress, whereas right to left indicates movement to the past or regression – but there is a further negative feeling that doesn’t occur with left to right. while initially, this could be about what we are used to  – reading, right-handedness, conventions in mathematical representation etc, it seems that it is a constant across cultures.

See the original article at NoFIlmSchool for more info.

But before we move, we need to know where we place our subjects and other cues that form the narrative that communicates the story.

Originally posted by V Renee on Nofilmschool

See all the basics of storyboarding in infographic form!

Planning is just as important to filmmaking as the camera itself, and one way you can be prepared, especially for those chaotic days on set, is by storyboarding. This process helps the director, DP, and other departments pre-visualize what shots and scenes are going to look like before they shoot them. It can be a bit difficult to know where to start if you’ve never done it, but this infographic by Jugaad Animation helps walk you through it step by step, explaining key components, as well as what to look out for as you go. Check it out below:
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Originally Posted by Robert Hardy on Nofilmschool
Final Cut Pro X Storyboarding
I’m not sure about you guys, but I’m terrible at drawing. Even stick figures give me a hard time. It’s embarrassing.

Unfortunately, storyboards are an integral part of the pre-production process for some people, which puts artistically-incompetent folks like myself at a major disadvantage when it comes to producing pre-visualization content. And even though there are loads of software solutions for creating storyboards out there, many of them are overly-complicated and too time consuming to be of any practical use.
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Reflective Practice pt1

Posted: November 3, 2016 by Alan Hardcastle in FDA 16_18
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You need to keep a Blog. This can be written, sound, video – anything, as long you are making a record of an event or action you have been involved in.

In general, while it can be descriptive, it is useful to think: What? So What? Do What?

What? Describe what happened or what you did.

So What? Why was it important?

Do What? What are you going to next?

This can be a quick way to keep a note of what has happened- involvement in a shoot, an experiment you have done, some research you have found.

When it comes to the Reflective Report it is useful to refer back to these. You can save words by referring to your descriptions in the blog, and look with hindsight as to how useful anything you have done was. This way, you can develop a spiral approach to your own learning.

This is when we can use Gibbs Reflective Cycle –

gibbs-pdf

So now we have:

Description – Describe what you did, what happened – the “What” moment.

Feelings – Explore how you felt about this – it could be a piece of research that jumped out at you. This is an important element of self analysis.

Evaluation – Begin to explore the “So What?” of the event – what was good about it? What was bad?

Analysis – begging to look at the why of the event. Why was it useful? Break the thing down into elements to look at it more clearly. You may not have enjoyed the whole thing, but ther ewas one bit that got you interested…

Conclusion – Draw conclusions about the experience in total, summarizing the important elements.

Action Plan – How can you apply what you have experienced?

Once you have action planned, you can start the cycle. This is what really makes this reflective – you have an experience, and you analyze how you can learning and apply parts of the experience.

Mis-en-scene

Posted: September 19, 2016 by Alan Hardcastle in Creative Media Production, General, Media Production
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Mis-en-scene. Yeas, it’s an outcome on the briefs, but it is also vital to you as a video or film maker. A french term, meaning ‘What we see in the frame’ – when analyzing a scene, we explore everything we see – and when we are making , we consider everything we place into the scene. Here is a handy and long guide to what you need to think about…

mise-en-scene

So, head over to shohawk.com for the original post and some great examples…