Posts Tagged ‘pdp’

PDP: Learning Styles

Posted: April 30, 2012 by Alan Hardcastle in FdA 11_13
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Your Background

Posted: March 19, 2012 by Alan Hardcastle in FdA 11_13
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This section allows you to record your current skills, knowledge and competence in relation to qualifications, work-experience, positions of responsibility and extracurricular activities. Here is the chance to look in detail at how you have developed as a result of all these experiences, using both your own self-reflection and feedback from objective sources. There is also an opportunity to pinpoint your key strengths and key areas for improvement.

The more information you can gather from other sources the better. Look back at your school reports and examination comments; it will help you to gain a greater perspective on how you have developed.

As you gain more qualifications, add the details to this record – you’ll be glad you did when it comes to writing your CV or filling in application forms.

Take time to make notes in the Editable Word Doc Background Extra Curricular Activities on how you have developed as a result of your non academic life.

Your Qualifications

Your Key Strengths

Your Areas for Imporvement

Extra Curricular Activites

All documentation generated by Bridgwater College.

The PDP Programme

Posted: March 19, 2012 by Alan Hardcastle in FdA 11_13
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The PDP programme contains sections on the following which we will be lookign at in tutorial over the next few months. You will also find a numbe rof these are covered in WBL.

1 Key Skills

This section covers the important area of Key Skills: What are they? Why are employers so keen on them? Do I have any? How do I develop mine? Completing the audit will help you to plan how you will move your key skills forward.

2 Background

This section allows you to record your current skills, knowledge and competence in relation to qualifications, work-experience, positions of responsibility and extracurricular activities. Here is the chance to look in detail at how you have developed as a result of all these experiences, using both your own self-reflection and feedback from objective sources. There is also an opportunity to pinpoint your key strengths and key areas for improvement.

3 Learning Style

The quiz in this section helps you recognise your learning style. A crucial step in increasing your effectiveness and reaching your potential.

4 Goals
Setting clear goals for the different areas of your life can be invaluable. This section allows you to bring into focus your aspirations in terms of your career, your academic ambitions and your personal goals.

5 Employability

This section describes some of the characteristics that employers are seeking from their employees.

6 Job Applications

This section contains useful tips on producing a professional CV. By completing the main sections of this guide you will have already done much of the hard work. It pays to keep track of things as you go along so that you have all the information at your fingertips when it comes to applying for your next step.

7 Interviews

This section looks at the skills required in order to come across well at an interview.

8 Reference

This section includes a link to your Reference Summary page. This is the only part of your file which will be held by your tutor and will contain the information you want to be included in your references.

Personal Development Planning (PDP)

Posted: March 19, 2012 by Alan Hardcastle in FdA 11_13
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Introduction

Personal Development Planning will help you to define and explore your goals and map out ways of turning them into reality. It will enable you to identify the skills you are developing now which will help you to open up opportunities in the future.

Using the templates in this guide you can build up your Personal Development Plan. It will grow according to your input and should help you to manage your own development.

You can either print your documents, or store them to disk. However you decide to manage your files, make sure you keep them safe to use as a reference when you leave.

Whilst studying, it is likely that you will have many opportunities to expand your academic, professional and personal horizons. The level of engagement and what you get out of your period of higher education is your choice. You have responsibility for your own learning.

Taking stock of your position and setting goals in all areas of your life is an important step. In order to maximise your potential it will be helpful if you are clear about how you can transfer the skills and knowledge you have acquired into other situations. You should learn to articulate your unique skills and abilities.

This guide to Personal Development Planning is designed to help you identify where you are and where you want to be.

To use your PDP effectively, you should start by familiarising yourself with its contents. Scan through each section so that you have a clear idea of what is to be achieved. Decide which sections you want to concentrate on first and which will be more appropriate to focus on later in your studies. Take your time and return to update or add to each section as often as you like.

By choosing to work through this guide you are carrying out a number of key functions:

Firstly you are taking stock. Evaluating the skills and abilities you already possess. You’ll hopefully recognise some of your strengths and spot some of your weaknesses.

You will have the space to reflect upon where you want to be. Recognising your personal goals, your objectives and dreams is the first step to achieving them.

You will have the chance to plan ahead. There is space to plan what you want to achieve from your academic, career and personal life; to think about both the knowledge you can develop and the skills you can improve.

Finally, most important of all, you are developing the skill of critical self-reflection. You have the chance to be honest with yourself, to understand a little more about who you are and what you can actually do. Developing these abilities is essential as it will help you both academically and in your search for employment.

Mature students

As a mature student you may already have some experience of skills mapping, reflective practice, learning styles, career planning, CV and interview technique. The decision to return to education may have been step one of your career plan. It is still of benefit to continually reassess your goals and adapt your plans accordingly.

Using this guide will help you to pull together all the experience you have accumulated in one place and set new goals for the future. Taking a fresh look at your skills competencies can only increase your confidence.

Some of the examples provided may not seem relevant to your circumstances. You may have work and family responsibilities and no spare time for extracurricular activities. But in analysing your strengths, think laterally: juggling family life and your studies shows commitment, organisation, time-management and adaptability – all important skills. You can illustrate this with examples from your own activities such as helping at playgroup, listening to reading in school or committee work.

Other examples include being treasurer of a local football club, attending night classes, associations with industry, membership of a professional body and voluntary work.

If you have come back to study to facilitate a change in career, your past work experience may seem irrelevant. Analysing your job roles in terms of key skills will help you to maximise your prior experience and relate it to your chosen field.

International Students

As an international student you have much to benefit from personal development planning. Since you are living and studying in a different country you will probably be more acutely aware of your need to develop your skills and experience than ‘home’ students. This is because you will have to acquire new skills that enable you to operate in a different culture to the one you are used to.

Some of the priority areas for your PDP are likely to include:

  • English language skills
  • Learning about western styles of learning, teaching and assessment
  • Developing social skills to help you ‘settle in’
  • Coping with a different culture

Much of the material in the College PDP has been reproduced from material produced by the University of Plymouth and Bournemouth University for PDP programmes for their students.